Illustrated Journal (Hands, Stick Figures and Colossal)

finalupload

Above is an image of my initials spelled out in sign language. I started out by taking reference images using my phone and then transferring them to my computer to view in larger scale; enhancing detail visibility. I then replicated the hands (each with its own individual photo) onto paper using a standard ink pen. The process took me about and hour, perhaps a bit over. I was quite surprised with how this piece had turned out for I never really draw people let alone human hands.

123

The three images above are a result of my first attempts to draw a stick figure with realistic human body proportions. Out of the three, I feel the first came out the best. About half an hour later I drew the second figure from the top. This time I tried to experiment with posing the stick figure, in a rather uneasy off-balance pose if I may add. This was just a test to see if I could keep the proportions of the arms and legs within a good range without being able to line up with the limb on the opposite side. Same applies to the very last image.

MoGanji_06.jpg

The above image is one of the many displayed on a post on thisiscolossal.com (click image above to view original post). The post is titled “Minimalistic One Line Tattoos” by Mo Gangi. Two elements of design that bring piece to life are line and shape. When most people think of a “life-like” tattoo, the usually think of lots of color, shading and possibly perspective tricks. But just buy using various line weights, the artist is able to give the tattoo a living quality; as if about to start breathing or speaking on the person’s arm. The heavier line weight on the outside of the face helps to strengthen the presence of features such as the jaw, eyes and eyebrows. Smaller lighter line weights are used to include other minor yet important details. Through a single line, Gangi is able to bring to life a basic representation of the human face on someone’s body. The second element I brought up was shape. Through the single continuous line, Gangi’s use of shapes helps add great detail to the image, but keeps it fairly simple. If you look at the image closely you’ll notice that the face’s features mainly consist of circles and oval shapes; the eyes, mouth, cheek and even the chin. Even with the use of very few basic shapes, Gangi was able to successfully create the details of a human face without going into extreme detail but at the same time drawing attention to the eye.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Illustrated Journals, Non-Timebased and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s