Visual Instrument – Documentation

Video:

 

The input decision for this project went through three different decisions. At first I intended to create the software to interact with an Arduino board, but was then asked if I could do it in a VR system. After developing for VR for about a week I was asked again to do Arduino; finally settling with using the Adafruit Playground Arduino board. I used the two buttons on the Playground to simulate key pressed (left button was assigned the “a” key and the right button was assigned the “d” key). Pressing A would emit a single glowing orb and send it in a random direction from the emitter’s origin point. Holding down the “a” button would cause the orbs to spawn at a rapid rate; each going a different direction. The “d” button was saved for the solo in the middle the performance when the second guitarist (Mark Tremonti) takes over for the second half; the first half being played by Myles Kennedy. The slide switch was programmed to enable and disable mouse cursor movement functionality. This allowed me to disable mouse input through the accelerometer when the rotation speed was at desirable rate, as well as the flashing of the audio spectrum.  When I was ready to accept mouse input to change rotation speeds or flash the audio spectrum some more, I flipped the switch to the other side and tilted the board in whatever way needed; changing the visuals on the screen. In the end the project required seven prefabs: four different colored orbs, one glowing grid that changes size dynamically and the audio spectrum blocks. Five scripts were written from scratch; each responsible for a specific function to help keep implementation clean and not use too many resources (grabbing instances from the scene hierarchy, object pooling, etc). These scripts included a camera spin control to control the camera spin speed as well as the spectrum flash value, an audio visualizer to control the scale of the spectrum pieces on the Y-axis to fit the amplitude of the various frequencies , a script to create the blocks and place them in the correct areas on scene start (amount of blocks depended on the bit rate of the audio), a glow grid script to control the dynamic growth of the grid that is enabled during the second half of the solo and finally a beat action script that would choose a random glowing orb from an array of orbs, choose a random transform to aim the emitter at, and finally, shooting the orb in the direction of the transform.

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s